Capitalism and Externalities

Capitalism and Externalities

Capitalism has come under fire in the recent years in ways that I would not have predicted as I completed my college degree and entered the workforce. For so many years the idea of capitalism has been central to the American story and to American identity. It may not be perfect, but it has always … Continue reading Capitalism and Externalities

Help Them Build a Better Life

Help Them Build a Better Life

It is an unavoidable reality that we are more motivated by what is in our immediate self-interest than we would like to admit. This idea is at the heart of Kevin Simler and Robin Hanson's book The Elephant in the BrainĀ and can be seen everywhere if you open your eyes to recognize it. I'm currently … Continue reading Help Them Build a Better Life

Excesses and Externalities

The Problem with our Excesses

My previous post was about our desires to live a life that never involves any pain or suffering. We try to build a life for ourselves and our loved ones where every moment is happy, and where we never have to engage in drudgery, never experience physical discomfort, and never face any obstacles. Today's post … Continue reading The Problem with our Excesses

Religion As a Community Social Structure

There are not many things that pull people together quite like religious beliefs. Sports pull us together when our kids are on the same team, when we are all in a stadium, or when two of us are wearing the right hat on an airplane, but those don't make for strong ties that are lasting … Continue reading Religion As a Community Social Structure

Norms and Productive Coordination

In my previous post I wrote about wasteful competition that occurs between animals within the same species, including us humans. To try to be impressive, we do a lot of things that are relatively wasteful. We might spend hours and hours focusing on developing a single skill, some animals will spend lots of time building … Continue reading Norms and Productive Coordination

The Purchases We Make

In their book The Elephant in the Brain, Kevin Simler and Robin Hanson write about "conspicuous consumption," a term coined by economist and sociologist Thorstein Veblen who lived about 100 years ago. Simler and Hanson write, "When consumers are asked why they bought an expensive watch or high-end handbag, they often cite material factors like … Continue reading The Purchases We Make

Deception is Expected

Robin Hanson and Kevin Simler consider it normal and expected that humans are deceptive creatures. We evolved, according to the authors, to be deceptive so that we could get a little bit more for ourselves and have a slightly better chance of reproducing and keeping our genes in the mix. We don't boldly take things … Continue reading Deception is Expected

The Purchases We Make

In their book The Elephant in the Brain, Kevin Simler and Robin Hanson write about "conspicuous consumption," a term coined by economist and sociologist Thorstein Veblen who lived about 100 years ago. Simler and Hanson write, "When consumers are asked why they bought an expensive watch or high-end handbag, they often cite material factors like … Continue reading The Purchases We Make