The Remembering Self and Time - Joe Abittan

The Remembering Self and Time

Time, as we have known it, has only been with human beings for a small slice of human history. The story of time zones is fascinating, and really began once rail roads connected the United States. Before we had a standardized system for operating within time, human lives were ruled by the cycle of the … Continue reading The Remembering Self and Time

Experiencing Versus Remembering

Experiencing Versus Remembering

My last two posts have been about the difference in how we experience life and how we remember what happens in our life. This is an important idea in Daniel Kahneman's book Thinking Fast and Slow. Kahneman explains the ways in which our minds make predictable errors when thinking statistically, when trying to remember the … Continue reading Experiencing Versus Remembering

Frame Bound vs Reality Bound

Frame Bound vs Reality Bound

My wife works with families with children with disabilities and one of the things I learned from her is how to ask children to do something. When speaking with an adult, we often use softeners when requesting that the other person do something, but this doesn't work with children. So while we may say to … Continue reading Frame Bound vs Reality Bound

Imaginary Reference Points

Imaginary Reference Points

My last post was about reference points and how they can create subjective experiences that differ from person to person. If my refence point is dramatically different than another person's, then our experience of the same objective fact or reality can be quite different. If I suddenly won $1 million dollars my life might change … Continue reading Imaginary Reference Points

Understanding the Past

Understanding the Past

I am always fascinated by the idea, that continually demonstrates validity in my own life, that the more we learn about something, the more realize how little we actually know about it. I am currently reading Yuval Noah Harari's book Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind, and I am continually struck by how often Harari … Continue reading Understanding the Past

The Emotional Replica of Reality in our Brains

The Emotional Replica of Reality Within Our Brains

It feels weird to acknowledge that the model for reality within our brains is nothing more than a model. It is a construction of what constitutes reality based on our experiences and based on the electrical stimuli that reach our brain from various sensory organs, tissues, and nerve endings. The brain doesn't have a model … Continue reading The Emotional Replica of Reality Within Our Brains

Stimuli, Attention, and What We Notice

Stimuli, Attention, and What We Notice

"Wherever you direct your gaze, you will meet with something that might stand out from the rest, if the context in which you read it were not equally notable," writes Seneca in Letters From a Stoic.   Quite a while back I listened to a podcast interview with the founder of a music streaming service … Continue reading Stimuli, Attention, and What We Notice

Our Efforts to Avoid Pain

Our Efforts to Avoid Pain

I had an amazing track coach at Reno High School. His name was Mark Smith (everyone called him Smitty) and like all great coaches, he knew what high school students needed in their workouts and in their heads in order to be successful both in sports and in life.   Some of the neighborhoods that … Continue reading Our Efforts to Avoid Pain

How Our Poorly Evolved Brains Contribute to Political Dysfunction

One of my beliefs about human beings is that we are currently operating in a world that has far outpaced the realities that our brains were evolved to live within. We are social creatures that operate in political tribes, and the social and political situations of our ancestors lives have pushed our brains to be … Continue reading How Our Poorly Evolved Brains Contribute to Political Dysfunction

Our Devious Minds

"We now realize," write Kevin Simler and Robin Hanson in their book The Elephant in the Brain, "that our brains aren't just hapless and quirky - they're devious. They intentionally hide information from us, helping us fabricate plausible pro-social motives to act as cover stories for our less savory agendas. As Trivers puts it: "At … Continue reading Our Devious Minds