Stimuli, Attention, and What We Notice

Stimuli, Attention, and What We Notice

"Wherever you direct your gaze, you will meet with something that might stand out from the rest, if the context in which you read it were not equally notable," writes Seneca in Letters From a Stoic.   Quite a while back I listened to a podcast interview with the founder of a music streaming service … Continue reading Stimuli, Attention, and What We Notice

Our Efforts to Avoid Pain

Our Efforts to Avoid Pain

I had an amazing track coach at Reno High School. His name was Mark Smith (everyone called him Smitty) and like all great coaches, he knew what high school students needed in their workouts and in their heads in order to be successful both in sports and in life.   Some of the neighborhoods that … Continue reading Our Efforts to Avoid Pain

How Our Poorly Evolved Brains Contribute to Political Dysfunction

One of my beliefs about human beings is that we are currently operating in a world that has far outpaced the realities that our brains were evolved to live within. We are social creatures that operate in political tribes, and the social and political situations of our ancestors lives have pushed our brains to be … Continue reading How Our Poorly Evolved Brains Contribute to Political Dysfunction

Our Devious Minds

"We now realize," write Kevin Simler and Robin Hanson in their book The Elephant in the Brain, "that our brains aren't just hapless and quirky - they're devious. They intentionally hide information from us, helping us fabricate plausible pro-social motives to act as cover stories for our less savory agendas. As Trivers puts it: "At … Continue reading Our Devious Minds

The Bounds of Opinion

"Nature's wants are slight; the demands of opinion are boundless," writes Seneca in Letters From a Stoic. Nature is indifferent to humans. The world exists and life exists upon it, but the world doesn't seem worried about what life flourishes, how it flourishes, and what life does. It simply carries on and life must react … Continue reading The Bounds of Opinion

Pessoa on Politicians

Fernando Pessoa was a Portugese writer in the 1930's. I'm not sure if he was really involved with politics at all, but in The Book of Disquiet he had a short passage that I think describes politicians well. He writes,   "The government of the world begins in ourselves. It is not the sincere who govern … Continue reading Pessoa on Politicians

Our Perceptions of the World

In a diary entry dated 04/08/1931 in Fernando Pessoa's posthumously published book The Book of Disquiet, Pessoa writes, "For us everything lies in our concept of the world; changing our concept of the world means changing our world, that is, the world itself, since it will never be anything other than how we perceive it." … Continue reading Our Perceptions of the World

Selective Attention

I listened to an episode of the After On podcast this last week, and the guest, Dr. Don Hoffman, suggested that our brains did not evolve to help us understand reality, but evolved to help us survive, which often did not require that our ancestors have the most accurate view of reality but instead had … Continue reading Selective Attention

Our Ego Creates a Story

An egomaniac is someone who is too overconfident in their own abilities, believes they are more worthy of praise than they actually are, and generally thinks too highly of themselves. What they believe about themselves and the reality of their skills and abilities is in a state of misalignment. The ego creates a false narrative … Continue reading Our Ego Creates a Story