Scaling Local Networks

Scaling Local Networks

Dave Chase presents an interesting idea about local networks in his book The Opioid Crisis Wake-Up Call. Local networks, Chase explains, grew from the small groups and tribes that humans evolved within. The systems and structures that allowed for cooperation in small groups, have evolved into complex structures of institutions like government, insurance risk pools, … Continue reading Scaling Local Networks

How Our Poorly Evolved Brains Contribute to Political Dysfunction

One of my beliefs about human beings is that we are currently operating in a world that has far outpaced the realities that our brains were evolved to live within. We are social creatures that operate in political tribes, and the social and political situations of our ancestors lives have pushed our brains to be … Continue reading How Our Poorly Evolved Brains Contribute to Political Dysfunction

On Charity, Evolution, and Potential Blind Spots

"Spontaneous generosity may not be the most effective way to improve human welfare on a global scale, but it's effective where our ancestors needed it to be: at finding mates and building a strong network of allies." Kevin Simler and Robin Hanson include this quote in their book The Elephant in the Brain when looking … Continue reading On Charity, Evolution, and Potential Blind Spots

Social Brain Hypothesis

The California Redwoods are amazing trees. They stand taller than any other tree, scraping at the sky as they compete among each other for sunlight. The trees can be packed together in a dense manner, all competing for the same light, all pulling massive amounts of water from the ground up enormous heights. What is … Continue reading Social Brain Hypothesis

Loyalty and Beliefs

Loyalty in social tribes is important. If you are consistently loyal to a strong, smart, and well connected individual in a small group, you can receive a lot of direct benefits. Being disloyal, failing to conform, and only occasionally supporting the person in the social group with the highest social status will not get you … Continue reading Loyalty and Beliefs

The Social Brain Hypothesis

The California redwoods are amazing trees. They stand taller than any other tree, scraping at the sky as they compete among each other for sunlight. The trees can be packed together in a dense manner, all competing for the same light, all pulling massive amounts of water from the ground up enormous heights. What is … Continue reading The Social Brain Hypothesis

The Purchases We Make

In their book The Elephant in the Brain, Kevin Simler and Robin Hanson write about "conspicuous consumption," a term coined by economist and sociologist Thorstein Veblen who lived about 100 years ago. Simler and Hanson write, "When consumers are asked why they bought an expensive watch or high-end handbag, they often cite material factors like … Continue reading The Purchases We Make

Designed to Act on Hidden Motives

The human brain evolved in a social and political context. As our species developed, it mattered who you were close allies with, who you were opposed to, and who you cooperated with to survive. You needed to build up your social support to survive each day, but you also needed to build up your status … Continue reading Designed to Act on Hidden Motives