A Lack of Internal Consistency

A Lack of Internal Consistency

Something I have been trying to keep in mind lately is that our internal beliefs are not as consistent as we might imagine. This is important right now because our recent presidential election has highlighted the divide between many Americans. In most of the circles I am a part of, people cannot imagine how anyone … Continue reading A Lack of Internal Consistency

Can You Remember Your Prior Beliefs? - Joe Abittan

Can You Remember Your Prior Beliefs?

"A general limitation of the human mind," writes Daniel Kahneman in his book Thinking Fast and Slow, "is its imperfect ability to reconstruct past states of knowledge, or beliefs that have changed. Once you adopt a new view of the world (or any part of it), you immediately lose much of your ability to recall … Continue reading Can You Remember Your Prior Beliefs?

The Mental Scaffolding for Religious Belief

The Mental Scaffolding of Religious Belief

Yesterday's post was about our mental structure for seeing causality in the world where there is none. We attribute agency to inanimate objects, imbue them with emotions, attribute intentions, and ascribe goals to objects that don't appear to have any capacity for conscious thought or awareness. From a young age, our minds are built to … Continue reading The Mental Scaffolding of Religious Belief

Familiarity vs Truth

Familiarity vs Truth

People who wish to spread disinformation don't have to try very hard to get people to believe that what they are saying is true, or that their BS at least has some element of truth to it. All it takes, is frequent repetition. "A reliable way to make people believe in falsehoods," writes Daniel Kahneman … Continue reading Familiarity vs Truth

Motivated Reasoning – Arguments to Continue Believing As We Already Do

Recently I have been thinking a lot about the way we think. To each of us, it feels as though our thinking and our thought process is logical, that our assumptions about the world are sound and built on good evidence, and that we might have a few complex technical facts wrong, but our judgments … Continue reading Motivated Reasoning – Arguments to Continue Believing As We Already Do

How We Define Our World

Our thoughts are generally not just our own thoughts. What we think, what we say, and ultimately what we do is influenced by other people. We are social animals and come to understand ourselves and define ourselves socially. However, we often are not aware of just how much this social conditioning shapes our thinking and … Continue reading How We Define Our World

Beliefs Are Not Always in the Driver’s Seat

I am not a religious person. I can explain to you all the reasons why I don't believe there is a deity who created the universe or interjects into our lives, but according to Kevin Simler and Robin Hanson, that might not be a particular meaningful thing to try to communicate. If I set out … Continue reading Beliefs Are Not Always in the Driver’s Seat

Egocentric Bias

I was reading an political science paper in an academic journal last night and came across a sentence that really stood out to me. The paper focused on the staffers who work for members of congress and whether they held accurate views of the constituents represented by the member of congress that they worked for. … Continue reading Egocentric Bias

Changing Your Views on a Group of People

An unfortunate reality in our world is that we don’t have a lot of incentives to change our beliefs about things. What we think and feel regarding a specific item is heavily influenced by more than just our own experiences and rational thoughts about that thing. Our social groups, self-interests, and group identities can shape … Continue reading Changing Your Views on a Group of People