Causal Versus Statistical Thinking

Causal Versus Statistical Thinking

Humans are naturally causal thinkers. We observe things happening in the world and begin to apply a causal reason to them, asking what could have led to the observation we made. We attribute intention and desire to people and things, and work out a narrative that explains why things happened the way they did.   … Continue reading Causal Versus Statistical Thinking

Mood, Creativity, & Cognitive Errors

Mood, Creativity, & Cognitive Errors

In Thinking Fast and Slow, Daniel Kahneman comments on research studying people's mood and cognitive performance. He writes the following about how we think when we are in a good mood, "when in a good mood, people become more intuitive and more creative but also less vigilant and more prone to logical errors."   We … Continue reading Mood, Creativity, & Cognitive Errors

Answering the Easy Question

Answering the Easy Question

One of my favorite pieces from Daniel Kahneman's book Thinking Fast and Slow, was the research Kahneman presented on mental substitution. Our brains work very quickly, and we don't always recognize the times when our thinking has moved in a direction we didn't intend. Our thinking seems to flow logically and naturally from one thought … Continue reading Answering the Easy Question

Expert Intuition

Expert Intuition

Much of Daniel Kahneman's book Thinking Fast and Slow is about the breakdowns in our thinking processes, especially regarding the mental shortcuts we use to make decisions. The reality of the world is that there is too much information, too many stimuli, too many things that we could focus on and consider at any given … Continue reading Expert Intuition

An Illusion of Security, Stability, and Control

The online world is a very interesting place. While we frequently say that we have concerns about privacy, about how our data is being used, and about what information is publicly available to us, very few people delete their social media accounts or take real action when a data breach occurs. We have been moving … Continue reading An Illusion of Security, Stability, and Control

Selective Attention

I listened to an episode of the After On podcast this last week, and the guest, Dr. Don Hoffman, suggested that our brains did not evolve to help us understand reality, but evolved to help us survive, which often did not require that our ancestors have the most accurate view of reality but instead had … Continue reading Selective Attention

Attribution Bias

Our brains are pretty impressive pattern recognition machines. We take in a lot of information about the world around us, remember stories, pull information together to form new thoughts and insights, move through the world based on the information we take in, and we are able to predict the results of actions before they have … Continue reading Attribution Bias