How We Chose to Measure Risk

How We Chose to Measure Risk

Risk is a tricky thing to think about, and how we chose to measure and communicate risk can make it even more challenging to comprehend. Our brains like to categorize things, and categorization is easiest when the categories are binary or represent three or fewer distinct possibilities. Once you start adding options and different possible … Continue reading How We Chose to Measure Risk

What’s Happening in Our Brains Behind the Conscious Self

Toward  the end of the introductory chapter of their book The Elephant in the Brain, Kevin Simler and Robin Hanson explain what they observed with the human mind and what they will be exploring in the coming chapters. They write, "What will emerge from this investigation is a portrait of the human species as strategically … Continue reading What’s Happening in Our Brains Behind the Conscious Self

Outsiders Within Our Own Minds

How good are you at introspection? How much do you know about yourself and how much do other people know about you that you don't actually know? I try to ask myself these types of questions and reflect on how much I don't actually recognize or know about myself, but it is really difficult. I … Continue reading Outsiders Within Our Own Minds

Deceiving Ourselves

Kevin Simler and Robin Hanson write about evolutionary psychology of the brain in their book The Elephant in the Brain to explain why it is that we have hidden motives and why those hidden motives can be so hard to identify. The authors write (brackets mine, italics in original), "The human brain, according to this … Continue reading Deceiving Ourselves

Game Theory of Mind

Game Theory Interactions with Self Deception

"Self deception is useful only when you're playing against an opponent who can take your mental state into account," write Kevin Simler and Robin Hanson in The Elephant in the Brain. "Sabotaging yourself works only when you're playing against an opponent with a theory-of-mind."  When we think about other people and their actions, we don't just … Continue reading Game Theory Interactions with Self Deception

Deception is Expected

Robin Hanson and Kevin Simler consider it normal and expected that humans are deceptive creatures. We evolved, according to the authors, to be deceptive so that we could get a little bit more for ourselves and have a slightly better chance of reproducing and keeping our genes in the mix. We don't boldly take things … Continue reading Deception is Expected

Deceiving Ourselves

Kevin Simler and Robin Hanson write about evolutionary psychology of the brain in their book The Elephant in the Brain to explain why it is that we have hidden motives and why those hidden motives can be so hard to identify. The authors write (brackets mine, italics in original), "The human brain, according to this … Continue reading Deceiving Ourselves

What’s Happening in Our Brains Behind the Conscious Self?

Toward  the end of the introductory chapter of their book The Elephant in the Brain, Kevin Simler and Robin Hanson explain what they observed with the human mind and what they will be exploring in the coming chapters. They write, "What will emerge from this investigation is a portrait of the human species as strategically … Continue reading What’s Happening in Our Brains Behind the Conscious Self?

More on Hiding Our Motives

Deception is a big part of being a human being. If we try, we can all think of times when we have been deceived. Someone led us to believe one thing, and then we found out that something different was really going on the whole time. If we are honest with ourselves, we can also … Continue reading More on Hiding Our Motives

Designed to Act on Hidden Motives

The human brain evolved in a social and political context. As our species developed, it mattered who you were close allies with, who you were opposed to, and who you cooperated with to survive. You needed to build up your social support to survive each day, but you also needed to build up your status … Continue reading Designed to Act on Hidden Motives