Mood, Creativity, & Cognitive Errors

Mood, Creativity, & Cognitive Errors

In Thinking Fast and Slow, Daniel Kahneman comments on research studying people's mood and cognitive performance. He writes the following about how we think when we are in a good mood, "when in a good mood, people become more intuitive and more creative but also less vigilant and more prone to logical errors."   We … Continue reading Mood, Creativity, & Cognitive Errors

Self-Control Depletion, Continued

Self-Control Depletion, Continued

"The evidence is persuasive," writes Daniel Kahneman in Thinking Fast and Slow, "activities that impose high demands on System 2 require self-control, and the exertion of self-control is depleting and unpleasant. Unlike cognitive load, ego depletion is at least in part a loss of motivation."   Yesterday I wrote about our misconceptions regarding individual self-control. … Continue reading Self-Control Depletion, Continued

Skill Versus Effort

Skill Versus Effort

In the world of sports, I have always enjoyed the saying that someone is so good at something they make it look easy. While I usually hear the saying in relation to physical activity, it also extends to other generally challenging activities – Kobe made the fadeaway jumper look easy, Tyler Cowen makes blogging look … Continue reading Skill Versus Effort

Stimuli, Attention, and What We Notice

Stimuli, Attention, and What We Notice

"Wherever you direct your gaze, you will meet with something that might stand out from the rest, if the context in which you read it were not equally notable," writes Seneca in Letters From a Stoic.   Quite a while back I listened to a podcast interview with the founder of a music streaming service … Continue reading Stimuli, Attention, and What We Notice

Constant Task Switching

Constant Task Switching

My last post was about training the brain to become less dependent on continuous novelty and to become better at concentrated focus. Training the brain for deep work requires that we wean ourselves from distractions and in some senses rewire our brains to be less dependent on distracting stimuli.   Cal Newport describes exactly what … Continue reading Constant Task Switching