What Does “The People” Mean?

"We the people" is a powerful phrase in the United States. It conjures images of democracy, freedom, revolution, and the power to push back against illiberal governments and disinterested elites. The phrase has been a rallying cry in movies for civic motivation, has been a symbol in politics for grassroots movements, and occupies and idyllic … Continue reading What Does “The People” Mean?

Jefferson on the Constitution

Joseph Ellis, in his book The Quartet argues that many of our founding fathers who actively participated in bringing us our constitution were not focused on creating an ever binding document that would hold in place the nation's laws forever. They sought, Ellis argues, to build a constitution that would serve as a guiding document for … Continue reading Jefferson on the Constitution

Paradoxes Within Our Constitution

The Constitution of the United States is over 230 years old. With many amendments added through the years, and with new interpretations of the Constitution, our country is still guided by a founding document written in 1787. What has made this document so enduring, argues Joseph Ellis in his book The Quartet, is not that … Continue reading Paradoxes Within Our Constitution

The Bill of Rights, Factions, and the Power of the Government

One of the debates that took place before the 1788 ratification of our Constitution was whether or not the constitution should include a Bill of Rights, guarantees of freedoms that limit the power of government over the states and citizens. As written, Madison thought the Constitution was complete, and did not see the need for … Continue reading The Bill of Rights, Factions, and the Power of the Government

Thoughts on the Federalist Papers

I have read about half of the Federalist Papers, a collection of over 80 papers written by James Madison, Alexander Hamilton, and John Jay under the pseudonym Publius. The articles ran in New York newspapers and were intended to influence the key decision makers in New York to vote in favor of the proposed constitution … Continue reading Thoughts on the Federalist Papers

Original Intent

A popular idea among many people, in regard to the Constitution of the United States is the idea of "Original Intent." It is a concept that suggests that our constitution should be strictly followed and narrowly interpreted, that what was written and ratified in 1788 is what should still guide our government today. Historian Joseph … Continue reading Original Intent

A Living Constitution

Our nation is very familiar with debates regarding the constitutionality of rules, regulations, actions, and laws enacted by the Federal Government. As I write this, there are constitutional challenges brought about by our current president with issues involving his profiting from foreign individuals staying at his hotels and questions about his ability to declare a … Continue reading A Living Constitution

Growing Wise With Age: A Quote From Ben Franklin

In his book The Quartet, author Joseph Ellis describes the conflicts and challenges that our founding fathers faced as they attempted to create a new constitution to replace the Articles of Confederation and tried to bring about a new American identity to unite all citizens living across the former British Colonies. The idea of a … Continue reading Growing Wise With Age: A Quote From Ben Franklin

Slavery in the American Constitution

In his book The Quartet, Joseph Ellis examines the debates leading up to the adoption of the current United States Constitution and the actions of four men in particular to drive the nation toward true nationhood and the adoption of the Constitution. George Washington, Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay all played crucial roles … Continue reading Slavery in the American Constitution

The Non-Transparent Constitutional Convention

In his book, Political Realism, Jonathan Rauch argues that some of the changes we have made to the political system of the Untied States in the last several years have been self-defeating in regards to the functioning, efficiency, and effectiveness of our government. In particular, our ever expanding pursuit of transparency and the degree to … Continue reading The Non-Transparent Constitutional Convention