Teamwork Contributions

Thinking About Who Deserves Credit for Good Teamwork

Yesterday I wrote about the Availability Heuristic, the term that Daniel Kahneman uses in his book Thinking Fast and Slow to describe the ways in which our brains misjudge frequency, amount, and probability based on how easily an example of something comes to mind. In his book, Kahneman describes individuals being more likely to overestimate … Continue reading Thinking About Who Deserves Credit for Good Teamwork

Rivalry Results in Strife

Rivalry Results in Strife

"Rivalry results in strife," writes Seneca in Letters From a Stoic. A quick Google search of strife gives us the definition: angry or bitter disagreement over fundamental issues; conflict. Rivalry heightens our disagreements, it clouds our judgments, and creates enemies who will oppose us. When we give in to rivalrous forms of thinking, we compare … Continue reading Rivalry Results in Strife

Recognize Your Thinking When You Are Displeased

A great challenge for our society is finding ways to get people to think beyond themselves. We frequently look for ways to confirm what we already believe, we frequently think about what we want and, and we frequently only consider only ourselves and how things make us feel in the present moment. Shifting these mindsets … Continue reading Recognize Your Thinking When You Are Displeased

Segregation of Trust and Opportunity

"Very often the United States deals with its problems by sending them away to a different part of the country or a different part of town or, saddest of all, by sending them to jail," writes Tyler Cowen in The Complacent Class. Cowen addresses our problems of segregation and incarceration in his book and looks … Continue reading Segregation of Trust and Opportunity

Cogoverning

A key aspect of new localism, as described by Bruce Katz and Jeremy Nowak in their book The New Localism, is cooperative governance. The national government and many state governments today are characterized and plagued by partisan gridlock, however local governments are able to function and get beyond gridlock through principles of new localism. Cogoverning … Continue reading Cogoverning

Factionalized

"Whenever and issue becomes factionalized," write Kevin Simler and Robin Hanson in The Elephant in the Brain, "framed as Us against Them, we should expect to find ourselves behaving more like an apparatchik competing to show loyalty to our team."   The human mind is exceptionally good at creating in-group and out-group perspectives. There are … Continue reading Factionalized

Prestige

Yesterday I wrote about using dominance to gain status by intimidating, bullying, and bulldozing ones way to prominence. Driving people's fears, pushing them to submission and capitulation, and using others to attain what you want are part of the strategy for dominance. While dominance may increase an individual's status, it is not a great approach … Continue reading Prestige

The Challenge of Trying to Enlarge the Pie

I often feel that we are moving so fast toward the future that we are advancing beyond our means. I think we are in some ways exceeding the capacity that we have evolved to fit, and this is creating great challenges for humans across the globe. We have new technologies, new social structures, and new … Continue reading The Challenge of Trying to Enlarge the Pie

Deception is Expected

Robin Hanson and Kevin Simler consider it normal and expected that humans are deceptive creatures. We evolved, according to the authors, to be deceptive so that we could get a little bit more for ourselves and have a slightly better chance of reproducing and keeping our genes in the mix. We don't boldly take things … Continue reading Deception is Expected