Missing Feedback

Missing Feedback

I generally think we are overconfident in our opinions. We should all be more skeptical that we are right, that we have made the best possible decisions, and that we truly understand how the world operates. Our worldviews can only be informed by our experiences and by the information we take in about events, phenomena, … Continue reading Missing Feedback

Hindsight Bias and Misleading Headlines

Hindsight Bias and Misleading Headlines

I absolutely hate internet ads that have headlines along the lines of "Analyst Who Predicted Stock Market Crash Says Makes New Prediction." These headlines are always nothing but clickbait, and reading Daniel Kahneman's book Thinking Fast and Slow has given me even more reason to hate these types of headlines. They play on cognitive errors … Continue reading Hindsight Bias and Misleading Headlines

Understanding the Past

Understanding the Past

I am always fascinated by the idea, that continually demonstrates validity in my own life, that the more we learn about something, the more realize how little we actually know about it. I am currently reading Yuval Noah Harari's book Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind, and I am continually struck by how often Harari … Continue reading Understanding the Past

Substitution Heuristics

Substitution Heuristics

I think heuristics are underrated. We should discuss heuristics as a society way more than we do. We barely acknowledge heuristics, but if we look closely, they are at the heart of many of our decisions, beliefs, and assumptions. They save us a lot of work and help us move through the world pretty smoothly, … Continue reading Substitution Heuristics

What You See Is All There Is

What You See Is All There Is

In Thinking Fast and Slow, Daniel Kahneman gives us the somewhat unwieldy acronym WYSIATI - what you see is all there is. The acronym describes a phenomenon that stems from how our brains work. System 1, the name that Kahneman gives to the part of our brain which is automatic, quick, and associative, can only … Continue reading What You See Is All There Is

pharmaceutical advertisements

Thoughts on Pharmaceutical Advertisements

"The reality is that most people hear more from pharmaceutical companies (16 to 18 hours of pharma ads per year) than from their doctor (typically under 2 hours per year)." writes Dave Chase in his book The Opioid Crisis Wake-Up Call. Chase is critical of American's looking for a quick fix and expecting a pill to … Continue reading Thoughts on Pharmaceutical Advertisements

An Illusion of Security, Stability, and Control

The online world is a very interesting place. While we frequently say that we have concerns about privacy, about how our data is being used, and about what information is publicly available to us, very few people delete their social media accounts or take real action when a data breach occurs. We have been moving … Continue reading An Illusion of Security, Stability, and Control

Two Messages

In The Elephant in the Brain Kevin Simler and Robin Hanson write about the ways in which we act to signal something important about ourselves that we cannot outright express. We deceive ourselves to believe that we are not sending these signals, but we recognize them, pick up on their subtle nature, and know how … Continue reading Two Messages

Sabotage Information

"Our minds are built to sabotage information in order to come out ahead in social games." In The Elephant in the Brain, Kevin Simler and Robin Hanson write about the ways in which we act out of our own self-interest without acknowledging it. We are more selfish, more deceptive, and less altruistic than we would … Continue reading Sabotage Information