Do People Make the Best Choices?

Do People Make the Best Choices?

My wife works with families with children with disabilities and for several years I worked in the healthcare space. A common idea between our two worlds was that the people being assisted are the experts on their own lives, and they know what is best for them. Parents are the experts for their children and … Continue reading Do People Make the Best Choices?

Can We Avoid Cognitive Errors?

Can We Avoid Cognitive Errors?

Daniel Kahneman is not very hopeful when it comes to our ability to avoid cognitive errors. Toward the end of his book Thinking Fast and Slow, a book all about cognitive errors, predictable biases, and situations in which we can recognize such biases and thinking errors, Kahneman isn't so sure there is much we can … Continue reading Can We Avoid Cognitive Errors?

Endowment Effects Joe Abittan

Endowment Effects

In his book Thinking Fast and Slow, Daniel Kahneman discusses an experiment he helped run to explore the endowment effect. The endowment effect is a cognitive fallacy that helps explain our attachment to things and our unwillingness to part with objects, even when we are offered something greater than the objective value of the the … Continue reading Endowment Effects

Overcoming Group Overconfidence

Overcoming Group Overconfidence

Overcoming group overconfidence is hard, but in Thinking Fast and Slow, Daniel Kahneman offers one partial remedy: a premortem. As opposed to a postmortem, and analysis of why a project failed, a premortem looks at why a program might fail before it has started.   Group communication is difficult. When the leader of a group … Continue reading Overcoming Group Overconfidence

Teamwork Contributions

Thinking About Who Deserves Credit for Good Teamwork

Yesterday I wrote about the Availability Heuristic, the term that Daniel Kahneman uses in his book Thinking Fast and Slow to describe the ways in which our brains misjudge frequency, amount, and probability based on how easily an example of something comes to mind. In his book, Kahneman describes individuals being more likely to overestimate … Continue reading Thinking About Who Deserves Credit for Good Teamwork

Guided by Impressions of System 1

Guided by Impressions of System 1

In Thinking Fast and Slow Daniel Kahneman shares research showing how easily people can be tricked or influenced by factors that seem to be completely irrelevant to the mental task that the people are asked to carry out. People will remember rhyming proverbs better than non-rhyming proverbs. People will trust a cited research source with … Continue reading Guided by Impressions of System 1

Thoughts on Biases

Thoughts on Biases

"Anything that makes it easier for the associative machine to run smoothly will also bias beliefs," writes Daniel Kahneman in his book Thinking Fast and Slow. Biases are an unavoidable part of our thinking. They can lead to terrible prejudices, habits, and meaningless preferences, but they can also help save us a lot of time, … Continue reading Thoughts on Biases

Recognize Situations Where Mistakes Are Common

Recognize Situations Where Mistakes Are Common

"Because System 1 operates automatically and cannot be turned off at will, errors of intuitive thought are often difficult to prevent," writes Daniel Kahneman in Thinking Fast and Slow. System 1 is how Kahneman describes the intuitive, quick reacting part of our brain that continually scans the environment and filters information going to System 2, … Continue reading Recognize Situations Where Mistakes Are Common

Answering the Easy Question

Answering the Easy Question

One of my favorite pieces from Daniel Kahneman's book Thinking Fast and Slow, was the research Kahneman presented on mental substitution. Our brains work very quickly, and we don't always recognize the times when our thinking has moved in a direction we didn't intend. Our thinking seems to flow logically and naturally from one thought … Continue reading Answering the Easy Question