Signaling Loyalty

Politics is an interesting world. We all have strong opinions about how the world should operate, but in general, most of us don't have much deep knowledge about any particular issue. We might understand the arguments about charter schools, about abortions, or about taxes, but very few of us have really studied any of these … Continue reading Signaling Loyalty

Sample Bias and Obliquity – Lessons from the Education Model

I studied political science for a masters and focused generally on public health. A big challenge in both areas is that the people who end up participating in our studies or who are the targets of our interventions are often different in one way or another from the general population, and that makes it hard … Continue reading Sample Bias and Obliquity – Lessons from the Education Model

Factionalized

"Whenever and issue becomes factionalized," write Kevin Simler and Robin Hanson in The Elephant in the Brain, "framed as Us against Them, we should expect to find ourselves behaving more like an apparatchik competing to show loyalty to our team."   The human mind is exceptionally good at creating in-group and out-group perspectives. There are … Continue reading Factionalized

Three Factors That Push In Favor of Religious Belief

In The Elephant in the Brain by Kevin Simler and Robin Hanson, the idea that many of the ways we act and behave have little to do with our stated reason for our actions and behaviors is explored in great detail. The authors' thesis is that our self-interest dominates many of our decisions. The authors … Continue reading Three Factors That Push In Favor of Religious Belief

Sex, Society, & Religion

An argument I found very persuasive in The Elephant in the Brain by Kevin Simler and Robin Hanson is that religions establish norms for sexual behavior in an attempt to help create social cohesion partly through systems of shared sexual family beliefs and values that build into family beliefs and values. The norms around sex ensure … Continue reading Sex, Society, & Religion

Religion As a Community Social Structure

There are not many things that pull people together quite like religious beliefs. Sports pull us together when our kids are on the same team, when we are all in a stadium, or when two of us are wearing the right hat on an airplane, but those don't make for strong ties that are lasting … Continue reading Religion As a Community Social Structure

Beliefs Are Not Always in the Driver’s Seat

I am not a religious person. I can explain to you all the reasons why I don't believe there is a deity who created the universe or interjects into our lives, but according to Kevin Simler and Robin Hanson, that might not be a particular meaningful thing to try to communicate. If I set out … Continue reading Beliefs Are Not Always in the Driver’s Seat

Signaling Work Potential

"In 2001, the Nobel Prize was awarded to economist Michael Spence for a mathematical model of one explanation for these puzzles: signaling. The basic idea is that students go to school not so much to learn useful job skills as to show off their work potential to future employers. In other words, the value of education … Continue reading Signaling Work Potential