pharmaceutical advertisements

Thoughts on Pharmaceutical Advertisements

“The reality is that most people hear more from pharmaceutical companies (16 to 18 hours of pharma ads per year) than from their doctor (typically under 2 hours per year).” writes Dave Chase in his book The Opioid Crisis Wake-Up Call. Chase is critical of American’s looking for a quick fix and expecting a pill to solve their problems. He says that short doctors appointments and a bombardment of pharmaceutical advertisements on TV contribute to the mindset that any disorder or illness can be fixed in a matter of minutes with a quick pill. With how much we hear from drug companies, and how little time we spend with someone who is trying to work with us in depth to correct behaviors, change our thoughts, improve muscle imbalances, or make adjustments to help us live a more healthy lifestyle, it isn’t hard to understand why most people think of medical care in the form of a pill.

 

I am wary of pharmaceutical advertisements. I don’t really understand if I am the target audience or if medical professionals are the target audience. I’m not sure if the goal is to just normalize taking pills, or if the goal is to educate patients about a potential solution for a potential problem. I’m not sure if the idea is to get people away from taking generic medication in favor of brand name drugs, or if it is to get people to try a medication and see if it helps them.

 

However, I also remember seeing a study which suggested that drug advertisements did help improve people’s health literacy, and did lead to patients being more likely to ask about medications which would help them, without finding an increase in patients asking about medications that wouldn’t be helpful for them. `When primary care providers are stressed, have limited time with patients, and are likely to miss important details, having patients with goals and specific questions about beneficial medication is important for overall health gains and an improved doctor-patient relationship. Additionally, advertisements approved by the FDA and at least somewhat regulated are better places for people to gain medical information about a drug than a Reddit or Facebook post from a random person.

 

Ultimately, I think I fall on the side of banning direct pharmaceutical advertisements. I find they are overly broad, dangerously support the idea that all one needs is a pill to solve all health problems, and ultimately are more about pharmaceutical companies than about improving health in general. I’m not 100% sure this is the best course, but I’d put my confidence around 75% sure this is the best path to pursue. I don’t think it would hurt America to be a little less focused on pills as cures rather than focused on lifestyle changes, especially if we start to favor policy changes that would support more healthy lives.