Laboratory Proof

“If the standard of laboratory proof had been applied to scurvy,” writes Judea Pearl in The Book of Why, “then sailors would have continued dying right up until the 1930’s, because until the discovery of vitamin C, there was no laboratory proof that citrus fruits prevented scurvy.” Pearl’s quote shows that high scientific standards for definitive and exact causality are not always for the greater good. Sometimes modern science will spurn clear statistical relationships and evidence because statistical relationships alone cannot be counted on as concrete causal evidence. A clear answer will not be given because some marginal unknowns may still exist, and this can have its own costs.
Sailors did not know why or how citrus fruits prevented scurvy, but observations demonstrated that citrus fruits managed to prevent scurvy. There was no clear understanding of what scurvy was or why citrus fruits were helpful, but it was commonly understood that a causal relationship existed. People acted on these observations and lives were saved.
On two episodes, the Don’t Panic Geocast has talked about journal articles in the British Medical Journal that make the same point as Pearl. As a critique of the need for randomized controlled trials, the two journal articles highlight the troubling reality that there have not been any randomized controlled trials on the effectiveness of parachute usage when jumping from airplanes. The articles are hilarious and clearly satirical, but ultimately come to the same point that Pearl does with the quote above – laboratory proof is not always necessary, practical, or reasonable when lives are on the line.
Pearl argues that we can rely on our abilities to identify causality even without laboratory proof when we have sufficient statistical analysis and understanding of relationships. Statisticians always tell us that correlation is not causation and that observational studies are not sufficient to determine causality, yet the citrus fruit and parachute examples highlight that this mindset is not always appropriate. Sometimes more realistic and common sense understanding of causation – even if supported with just correlational relationships and statistics – are more important than laboratory proof.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.