A Living Constitution

Our nation is very familiar with debates regarding the constitutionality of rules, regulations, actions, and laws enacted by the Federal Government. As I write this, there are constitutional challenges brought about by our current president with issues involving his profiting from foreign individuals staying at his hotels and questions about his ability to declare a national emergency to pull in funding to build a border structure between the United States and Mexico. The questions involve whether the United States Constitution gives the president authority to do something or bars the president from doing something. We are operating with a legal document that will be entering its 231st year of service in 2019, and it is clear to all that our founding fathers could not have written a document to address ever situation that our government finds itself in today.

 

Historian Joseph Ellis writes about the approach taken by the framers of the constitution in his book The Quartet and helps us understand our relationship to the document ratified in 1788. Ellis writes, “the multiple ambiguities embedded in the Constitution made it an inherently ‘living’ document. For it was designed not to offer clear answers to the sovereignty question (or, for that matter, to the scope of executive or judicial authority) but instead to provide a political arena in which arguments about those contested issues could continue in a deliberative fashion.”

 

James Madison, who greatly shaped the text and structure of the Constitution, was focused on creating a document that could pull together the delegates of the 13 states and create a stronger centralized government. Madison knew that he would need the support of large and small states, rural farmers and more industrialized people from burgeoning cities, and would need to convince them that they would all have a voice and that no one group would unduly dominate another. Ellis suggests that we should see the Constitution as a forum for continuous discussion and improvement. He believes that the intent of the framers was to create a guiding document that would provide for national unity and governance, while reacting to the needs and evolving nature of the nation through time. To look at the Constitution as a sacred text whose word must be followed in all situations raises the level of our founding fathers to an unreasonable level. It assumes that they were somehow more than human and that the document they created is somehow greater than any other legal document before or since. The only way we can truly move forward with governance is to continually re-imagine and reshape the Constitution to function within the unique demands and challenges of the time.

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